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Monday, May 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of Social protection of the informal sector in Southeast Asia found in the catalog.

Social protection of the informal sector in Southeast Asia

Isagani Antonio F. Yuzon

Social protection of the informal sector in Southeast Asia

by Isagani Antonio F. Yuzon

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  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Central Book Supply in Q.C. [i.e. Quezon City] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

StatementIsagani Antonio F. Yuzon.
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 185 p. ;
Number of Pages185
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23698594M
ISBN 109789716919714
LC Control Number2009316848

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.   COVID could bring about a 'new deal' for millions of Asia's informal workers. In the Asia-Pacific region, informal workers account for nearly 60% of non-farm workers, a group particularly vulnerable to economic disruption caused by COVID

It is clear that there is ample room not only to scale up social protection expenditures in Southeast Asia, but also to broaden coverage of social protection systems. assistance from the public sector because they do not meet the local definition of a business. RATE offers opportunities for action, at both the national and regional levels, for engaging the informal economy and ensuring that it receives the benefits that the AEC Blueprint sets out. ASEAN’s Approach ASEAN focuses indirectly on the.

In his The Moral Economy of the Peasant: Rebellion and Subsistence in Southeast Asia, Scott sets out to solve the puzzle why some types of exploitative relations give way to grassroots revolutions and others not. Scott complains that approaches to exploitation hitherto have Cited by:   ASEAS(UK) is a world-leading association of scholars of Southeast Asian matters and a globally respected leader in research and knowledge of this dynamic region. We work to foster and maintain the vibrancy of Southeast Asian studies with the aim of advancing individual and collective knowledge of this important region.


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Social protection of the informal sector in Southeast Asia by Isagani Antonio F. Yuzon Download PDF EPUB FB2

Asia’s growing labor force needs innovative solutions to reduce risks and ensure social protection of workers in vulnerable employment with informal arrangements. This book examines the need to expand social protection coverage of the informal sector to support working age productivity, reduce vulnerability, and improve economic opportunity.

4 Governance of Social Protection for Informal Sector Workers in Asia Babken Babajanian 5 Social Protection for Informal Workers in Pakistan: A Case Study of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Hina Shaikh 6 Social Protection for Informal Workers in the People’s Republic of China: A Study of Micro, Small, and Medium-Sized EnterprisesFile Size: 1MB.

This book offers a comparative analysis of social protection policies in five countries of South Asia — India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh — where economic transformation impelled by globalisation and liberalisation has, on the.

This paper looks at the experiences of various Asian countries in expanding the coverage of the pension system to informal sector workers. The paper argues that given aging and growing informality. Social protection and the informal sector in developing countries: challenges and opportunities (English) Abstract.

This paper is aimed at identifying the sources of income insecurity and vulnerability among workers in the informal sector in developing countries and examines alternative approaches to social protection for the informal by: Social Protection for the Informal Sector: The Issues Sudharshan Canagarajah and S.V.

Sethuraman* PART I 1. Introduction Ever since the emergence of a market economy during the 19th century, providing social protection to workers has remained a major concern among the developedFile Size: 5MB. Political economy of reform: Social protection reform in Pakistan, Haris Gazdar Sri Lanka’s experience of social development: Towards equity and justice, Laksiri Jayasuriya PART 3 Social sector spending in South Asia: A mixed bag, Aniruddha Bonnerjee outcomes on labour markets worldwide, particularly in the informal sector.

As the COVID spreads across regions with large informal economies (sub-Saharan Africa, South and Southeast Asia and Latin America), it is therefore expected that more informal workers will lose their jobs and face extreme poverty and food insecurity.

Despite high levels of economic growth during the past two decades, the informal economy in India still accounts for more than 80 per cent of non-agricultural employment. Informality is found in both the traditional informal economy and – increasingly – through the growth of informality in the formal sector.

The handling of social protection responsibilities in government structures 41 3. Reviewing experience and policy approaches 42 Poor people’s realities: implications for social protection from participatory research 42 Social protection through institutions outside the state: the historical experience of developed countries The concluding section argues for the need for social protection in South Asia by exposing the limitations of existing policies, and proposes a future course of action in order that social protection may serve as a tool in the transformation of social policy.

The informal sector deprives states of revenues and workers of social protection. It also, however, frequently constitutes the most dynamic part of the economy and creates massive employment. Informal employment is ubiquitous and growing.

The financial crisis that began in has made the management of informal employment even more : Johannes Jütting, Juan R. de Laiglesia.

Extension of Social Security Coverage for the Informal Economy in Indonesia:Surveys in the Urban and Rural Informal Economy ILO Subregional Office for South-East Asia and the Pacific Working Paper No. 11 ISBN ILO Cataloguing in Publication Data. Social Protection Discussion Paper Series Social Protection and the Informal Sector in Developing Countries: Challenges and Opportunities Sudharshan Canagarajah S.V.

Sethuraman December Social Protection Unit Human Development Network The World Bank Social Protection Discussion Papers are not formal publications of the World Bank. Podcast host Cyrus Afshar (Photo: R. Hernandez) The programme has three key pillars, based on the priorities for social protection expressed by informal workers.

The three pillars are: 1. Workers' Health. The aim of our Informal Workers Health Project is to provide a central point for information, research, activities & network building relating to the promotion of better health and better. JIN JIANG, JIWEI QIAN and ZHUOYI WEN, Social Protection for the Informal Sector in Urban China: Institutional Constraints and Self-selection Behaviour, Journal of Social Policy, /S, 47, 2, (), ().Cited by: 6.

Social protection policy in many of these jurisdictions is lacking, often with no reach into the informal sector, which can account for as much as % of the Indonesian labour force.

The ageing population in Indonesia – like in many other countries across Southeast Asia – also depends heavily on private transfers from adult children to. However, social protection for the labour force of the urban informal sector, which reaches about half the number of urban workers, lags significantly behind.

This under-coverage may be due to institutional constraints, particularly the household registration system hukou, and self-selection behaviour related to the limited benefits of social Cited by: 3. • billion people work in informal jobs compared to billion who benefit from formal contracts and social security protection.

• Informal economic activity, excluding the agricultural sector, accounts for three-quarters of jobs in Sub-Saharan Africa, more than two-thirds in South and Southeast Asia, half in Latin America, the Middle. policy in South Asia. As a result, social protection interventions are emerging as a key policy element across the region.

Social Protection in South Asia: A Review describes the most significant programmes in place in each of the eight South Asian countries.

It maps out the social protection agenda, as well as programme aims, design, scale and. For many of Indonesia’s urban poor who work in the informal sector, social distancing is nearly impossible if they want to maintain their income. Two key policies can help. To survive the pandemic, Indonesia’s urban poor need economic support and help with basic services.The World Bank estimates that informal workers make up 47% of jobs in the East Asia and Pacific region, with the figure rising to between 60% and 80% in lower income countries such as Myanmar and.For more data by status in employment, age, and branch of industry, download the pamphlet Counting the World's Informal Workers: A Global Snapshot (available in English, French and Spanish).

BY POVERTY LEVELS. Additional analysis in Women and Men in the Informal Economy, 3rd edition shows that not all informal workers are from poor households and not all formal workers are from non-poor.