Last edited by Mara
Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

8 edition of The Malatesta of Rimini and the Papal State found in the catalog.

The Malatesta of Rimini and the Papal State

by P. J. Jones

  • 276 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • European history: c 500 to c 1500,
  • c 1000 CE to c 1500,
  • Political Process - General,
  • History: World,
  • History,
  • History - General History,
  • Italy,
  • Politics and government,
  • Europe - Great Britain - General,
  • Western Europe - General,
  • History / Europe / Western,
  • History / Great Britain,
  • History-Europe - Great Britain - General,
  • Political Science-Political Process - General,
  • Malatesta family,
  • Papal States,
  • Rimini (Italy)

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages384
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7714031M
    ISBN 100521023645
    ISBN 109780521023641
    OCLC/WorldCa65978743

    Preview [The editors apologize for the delay in the publication of this review.] Sigismondo Malatesta, the papal vicar of Rimini and famed mercenary captain, has long enjoyed notoriety as a result of his defiant stance towards his overlords, the popes, who around the mid-fifteenth century had begun the laborious process of bringing the various parts of the Papal State under their direct The name of an Italian family prominent in the history of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, famous alike in the poetry of Dante and in the annals of the early Renaissance. The founder of their power was Malatesta da Verrucchio (died ), the leader of the Guelphs in Romagna, who in made himself master of Rimini by the slaughter of the chief members of the rival Ghibelline family ?id=

      Nevertheless, it was the cardinal's policy to let existing governments stand, provided they promised to act in subordination to the papal see. Thus he granted 'the Malatesta brothers the investiture of Rimini, Pesaro, Fano and Fossombrone, and they arranged a division of the ://   Pagan Virtue in a Christian World: Sigismondo Malatesta and the Italian Renaissance. By Anthony F. D’Elia (Cambridge Mass.,

    Jones, P.J. (), ‘ Communes and despots: the city state in late medieval Italy ’, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society 5 th series 15 Jones, P.J. (), The Malatesta of Rimini and the papal state   朝倉文市 『修道院 —— 禁欲と観想の中世 —— 』講談社現代新書 年 ビルギット・アダム 『 —— 王様も文豪もみな苦しんだ —— 性病の世界史』瀬野文教訳 草思社 年 石井美樹子 『中世の食卓から』筑摩書房 年


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The Malatesta of Rimini and the Papal State by P. J. Jones Download PDF EPUB FB2

A detailed history, from the mid-thirteenth to the early sixteenth century, of an Italian state, Rimini, and its ruling family, the Malatesta. The Malatesta are best known, through the works of Jacob Burckhardt, John Addington Symonds and others, for their colourful contribution to  › Books › Politics & Social Sciences › Politics & Government.

Buy The Malatesta of Rimini and the State 1st Pbk. Version by Jones, P. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible  › History › Europe › Great Britain. Preface; Abbreviations; Map of Romagna and the Marche in the later Middle Ages; 1.

The Papal State and Romagna in the thirteenth century; 2. Rimini and the rise of the Malatesta; 3. From commune to papal vicariate; 4. Galeotto Malatesta, 'ecclesie pugil'; 5. The prime of Malatesta rule: Carlo Malatesta; 6. The pontificate of Martin V; :// Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

The Malatesta of Rimini and the Papal State by Jones, P. J.,Cambridge University Press edition, in English A detailed history, from the mid-thirteenth to the early sixteenth century, of an Italian state, Rimini, and its ruling family, the Malatesta.

The Malatesta are best known, through the works of Jacob Burckhardt, John Addington Symonds and others, for their colourful contribution to the court life and culture of renaissance Italy.

There are other sides to their history of at least comparable 1. The Papal State and Romagna in the thirteenth century 2. Rimini and the rise of the Malatesta 3. From commune to papal vicariate 4. Galeotto Malatesta, 'ecclesie pugil' 5.

The prime of Malatesta rule: Carlo Malatesta 6. The pontificate of Martin V 8. The The Malatesta of Rimini and the Papal State [Elektronisk resurs] / P. Jones. Jones, P. (författare) ISBN Publicerad: Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Malatesta of Rimini and the Papal State: A Political History at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our :// Recommended reading for every destination on earth: We found 11 books set in Rimini.

Map The Malatesta of Rimini and the Papal State by P. Jones. No recommendations yet. Stones of Rimini Rimini (6 books) Romagna (4 books) Forlì-Cesena (3 books)   - Rimini (Portraits of Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta - left - and Federico da Montefeltro - right) Foreword: Ariminum (Ancient Rimini) Arco di Augusto at the Via Flaminia.

entrance to the town. In BC the Romans founded Ariminum, a town at the mouth of the River Marecchia, a small stream which traditionally marks the geographic border between Northern Italy and the :// 74 folios, preceded by 2 paper flyleaves and 2 parchment flyleaves, ending with 2 paper flyleaves, complete, mostly in quires of 8 (collation: i4, ii-ix8, x6), numerous catchwords on almost each verso folios inscribed in a later hand (some in red), some original catchwords (mostly cropped), written in brown ink in an Italian bâtarde bookhand, text on two columns (justification: x mm   Books & articles; Links to Other Websites; Projects.

Abstracts of Feet of Fines; Medieval Lands; Index to the Ancestry of Charles II; Contents key to Surtees' Parishes of Co. Durham; Declaration of Arbroath; Domesday Corrections.

Domesday People; Descendants (p. 1 - ) Descendants (p. ) Descendants (p. ) Descendants (p. Eventually Rimini, Cesena and Fano became a direct possession of the Papal State, while the other towns and fortresses covered in this section became part of the Duchy of Urbino which included Gubbio.

The last of the da Montefeltro died in with no issue after having adopted Francesco Maria I della Rovere, his sister's child and nephew of SIGISMONDO MALATESTA (born ; died ) was a son of Pandolfo di Galeotto Malatesta, the descendant of a half-brother of Gianciotto. On the abdication of his half-brother, Galeotto Roberto, inhe succeeded to the lordship of Rimini, Fano, and Cesena, as papal ://,   The Papal State(s), State(s) of the Church, or Pontifical States (Italian: Stato Pontificio, also Stato della Chiesa, Stati della Chiesa, Stati Pontifici, and Stato Ecclesiastico; Latin: Status Pontificius, also Dicio Pontificia) were among the major historical states of Italy from roughly the 6th century until the Italian peninsula was unified in by the Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia   Translated Title: The counts of s on Leiningen genealogy and history up to the territorial division of /18   The Papal States (/ p eɪ p ə l /) (Italian: Stato Pontificio), officially the State of the Church (Italian: Stato della Chiesa, Italian pronunciation: [ˈstaːto della ˈkjeːza]; Latin: Status Ecclesiasticus; also Dicio Pontificia), were a series of territories in the Italian Peninsula under the direct sovereign rule of the pope, from the 8th century until Carlo Malatesta was Papal Vicar, meaning that he was allowed to deputize for the Pope in the Rimini area.

Although the Malatesta didn’t owe their powerful position to the Pope, after Carlo Malatesta had died the Pope nevertheless tried to assume power over Rimini and to re-assign it.

Of course, the three heirs successfully refused to accept :// COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus The Papal State(s), the State(s) of the Church, the Pontifical States, the Ecclesiastical States, or the Roman States (Italian: Stato Pontificio, also Stato della Chiesa, Stati della Chiesa, Stati Pontifici, and Stato Ecclesiastico; Latin: Status Pontificius, also Dicio Pontificia) [1] were among the major historical states of Italy from roughly the 6th century until the Italian peninsula was States/en-en.

The expedition fails, but Malatesta brings back the bones of Gemisthus Plethon to Rimini and puts them in one of the sarcophagi flanking the Tempio. – Piccinino marries Drusiana, Francesco Sforza’s daughter. A few weeks later, he is "invited to lunch" in Naples and assassinated.

November – Malatesta Novello dies in /timeline-of-sigismondo-malatesta.Rimini was thenceforth a papal city, subject to the legate at Forlì. In a band of adventurers commanded by Ribbotti entered the city and proclaimed a constitution which was soon abolished.

In Rimini and the Romagna were incorporated with the Kingdom of Italy. Rimini was The illegitimate son of Pandolfo Malatesta III and Antonia da Barignani, Sigismondo, followed the family tradition and debuted as a man-of-arms at the age of 13 in this power struggle.

He became Lord of Rimini two years later. Accepting command of the papal corps